FAQ's - Frequently Asked Questions

What is 9-1-1? 

9-1-1 is the number most people in the U.S. and some in International countries call to get help in a police, fire or medical emergency.  A 9-1-1 call goes over dedicated phone networks to the appropriate 9-1-1 answering point (PSAP) for the caller's location, and trained personnel then send the emergency help needed.

When should you call 9-1-1? 

9-1-1 is only to be used in emergencies. An emergency is any situation that requires immediate assistance from the police, fire or rescue. 9-1-1 is for emergencies, potential emergencies, or when an emergency is imminent.

Ask yourself:

  • Is there a danger to life or property?
  • Is there a serious medical emergency (chest pains, seizures, bleeding, etc?)
  • Is there any type of fire (building, vehicle, brush, etc?)
  • Is there any crime in-progress (robbery, burglary, prowler, fights, etc?)
  • Are there any other life threatening situations (traffic accident with injuries, stuck in high water, etc?)
  • Is the caller or someone else the victim of a crime?

If you are ever in doubt of whether a situation is an emergency, you should call 9-1-1. It is better to be safe and let the 9-1-1 call taker determine if you need emergency assistance.

Please, do not call 9-1-1 to report that electricity or other utilities are off; to notify authorities of traffic jams; to inquire about government services or to learn general information.

How can YOU help us? 

When reporting an emergency:

  • Remain calm
  • Speak clearly
  • Listen to instructions
  • Answer all questions

The person answering 9-1-1 is a trained dispatcher. They have been trained as to what questions to ask. Be prepared to follow the dispatcher's line of questioning. (e.g., WHEN did the incident occur, WHAT is happening, WHERE the situation is occurring, WHO is involved, is a WEAPON involved, what INJURIES have been sustained, etc.).

Where do I call for non-emergency assistance? 

The emergency communications center has a non-emergency telephone number that are accessible to the public. For all non-emergency situations, please call 912-368-3911. Examples of calls that should be placed to the non-emergency number are:

  • Loud music or barking dogs
  • Requests for information

Why do dispatchers ask so many questions? 

Dispatchers ask for pertinent information first - address, type of call, name of caller or those involved. Once the initial information is obtained, additional questions may be asked depending on the type of call. The questioning will not slow down the dispatching of the appropriate assistance. In emergency cases, this information is relayed immediately to field units so they may begin responding to the incident, while the dispatcher remains on the phone to obtain further details that are also relayed to the responding units as it is gathered, in real time. The dispatcher will further assist callers by giving instructions to callers on how to administer life saving techniques, such as CPR, during medical emergencies; to take steps to promote the personal safety of the caller, the victim and responding Police, Fire or EMS personnel, and to engage in those actions that preserve evidence to aid in the apprehension of suspects.

What should I do if I call 9-1-1 by mistake? 

If you call 9-1-1 by mistake, DO NOT HANG UP . Stay on the line and tell the dispatcher that everything is all right. If a caller to 9-1-1 hangs up without stating the problem, the caller must be contacted in order to ensure that no actual emergency exits. This may involve the dispatching of an officer to your home or place of business in order to ensure that a problem does not exist. One common misconception that citizens have about dialing 9-1-1 by mistake is they will somehow get into trouble. This is not true!

What about 9-1-1 prank calls? 

It is a prank call when someone calls 9-1-1 for a joke, or calls 9-1-1 and hangs up. Prank calls not only waste time and money, but can also be dangerous. If 9-1-1 lines or call takers are busy with prank calls, someone with a real emergency may not be able to get the help they need.  It is against the law to make prank 9-1-1 calls.

Whom does the center dispatch? 

Liberty County Public Safety Communications (LCPSC) dispatches for Liberty County Police Departments, Animal Control, Fire and EMS Departments, Sheriff's Office and others.

How many calls does the center receive? 

Annually the communications department answers about 54,000 9-1-1 and approximately 160,000 non-emergency calls generating between 120,000 and 130,000 calls for service. The communications center is staffed 24 hours a day by a Communications Supervisor and as many as five Communications Officers.

Can the center communicate with the speech/hearing-impaired? 

Yes. LCPSC is equipped with Telecommunication Device for the Deaf (TDD) enabling communications with the speech/hearing-impaired callers.

If a caller uses a TTY/TDD, the caller should:

  • Stay calm, place the phone receiver in the TTY, dial 9-1-1.
  • After the call is answered, press the TTY keys several times. This may help shorten the time necessary to respond to the call.
  • Give the call taker time to connect their TTY. If necessary, press the TTY keys again. The 9-1-1 call taker should answer and type "GA" for Go Ahead.
  • Tell what is needed-police, fire department, or ambulance. Give your name, phone number and the address where help is needed
  • Stay on the telephone if it is safe. Answer the call taker's questions.

If a deaf or hearing/speech impaired caller does not have a TTY/TDD, the caller should call 9-1-1 and do not hang up. Not hanging up leaves the line open. With most 9-1-1 calls, the caller's address is displayed on the call taker's screen and help will be sent.

Can I call 9-1-1 from a pay phone? 

Yes. Local telephone service providers do not charge for calling 9-1-1 from all coin phones.

Can I call 9-1-1 from a cellular phone? 

Yes. When 9-1-1 is dialed on a cellular phone, a call from within Liberty County will be routed to LCPSC based on cellular tower site location. Depending on the type of call, geographical area and other factors, your call may need to be transferred to another jurisdiction or the Georgia State Patrol.  

I speak a foreign language. Can the 9-1-1 Center communicate with me during an emergency? 

Yes. When necessary, a 9-1-1 call taker can add an interpreter from an outside service to the line. LCPSC provides a service made available from Language Line Services. This service provides us over-the-phone interpretation of more than 140 languages, 24 hours a day. A non-English speaking caller may hear a short conversation in English and some clicking sounds as the interpreter is added to the line.

I am thinking of discontinuing my traditional phone service.  

Many people are making the decision to disconnect their home phone and move their home telephone to their cell phone. If you decide to use only a cell phone, keep these important tips in mind:

  • A typical home or work phone gives 9-1-1 call takers an exact location.  
  • Cell phones with location technology only provide an approximate location. 
  • If you have an outdated phone, the call taker may not receive any location information. 
  • Choose your phone wisely. Your life could depend on it.  

What if I have an Internet/Digital Phones? 

Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) also called Internet, digital, broadband or cable phone service, is a rapidly growing alternative to traditional phone service. Low prices, more features, and the ability to choose a phone number from nearly anywhere in the country primarily fuel its popularity.

VoIP may look and appear to work like a traditional phone, but it connects to the internet, not a telephone line. There are several critical factors to consider regarding the impact of this service on your ability to call 9-1-1 in an emergency.  It is important for consumers to understand the potential limitations the technology has with respect to accessing 9-1-1.

  • Check your service provider's website for emergency calling features
  • When calling 9-1-1, give your location, and call back number
  • Call back if you get disconnected.
  • If the power is out, your VoIP service may not work. Consider purchasing a backup power supply.
  • If you travel with your VoIP adapter, your call may not reach the correct 9-1-1 center.  If you need 9-1-1 service, use another phone.
  • Be sure to keep your registered location current with your VoIP provider
  • Inform children, babysitters, and visitors about your VoIP service.
  • Post your address and call back phone number near your phone.
  • Consider keeping a land line phone for accessing 9-1-1 emergency services
  • Burglar alarms, fax machines, satellite TV, and DVRs often rely on analog modems. Check with your VoIP provider to determine if their service supports analog modems.

Monthly Budgets

For 2014- 2015 year:

 

Online Payments

Liberty County is in the process of setting up the ability for its constituents to pay for items online.  Information will be available on this page when the system is operational.

Employment Opportunities

Applications for Communications Officer Trainee are accepted year-round and processed 1 or 2 times each year. Following the close of an application period applicants will be notified by mail of the date, time and location of testing. Please make sure to include your mailing address on your application if it is different from your physical address.

Please remember to keep your application up to date, especially your contact information. If we do not have your correct mailing address we not be able to contact you.

If you have any questions please contact us a LCPSC@libertycountyga.com or call 912-368-3911 and ask for Tom, Erica or Brit.

Animal Clinic Numbers

VETERINARY CLINICS AND PHONE #'S

BEATIE ANIMAL CLINIC   912-368-4080

COASTAL COMMUNITY VET CLINIC   912-448-2272

FLEMINGTON VETERINARY CLINIC   912-368-3226

DR. DEAL   912-654-0404

CEDAR ANIMAL HOSPITAL   912-756-7560

RICHMONDHILL VET CLINIC   912-756-3999

WOLFE ANIMAL HOSPITAL   912-427-3212

LIBERTY VETERINARY MEDICAL CLINIC   912-876-3357

 

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL PROTECTION AGENCY

1-800-282-5852  EXT. 4914

THIS AGENCY LICENSES ALL ANIMAL CONTROL FACILITIES, HUMANE SHELTERS AND SOCIETIES, PET STORES, AND KENNELS IN GEORGIA.

CALL THE ABOVE NUMBER TO REPORT ABUSE, NEGLECT, OR OTHER ISSUES WITH THE ABOVE AGENCIES OR IF YOU SEE FARM ANIMAL ABUSE OR NEGLECT.

 

THE GEORGIA DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES HANDLES ALL WILDLIFE CALLS IN GEORGIA.

912-264-7218

 

SURROUNDING AREA ANIMAL CONTROL OFFICES AND PHONE #'S

FORT STEWART   912-435-8032

LONG COUNTY ANIMAL CONTROL   912-545-2287

BRYAN COUNTY ANIMAL CONTROL   PEMBROKE OFFICE   912-653-3816

RICHMONDHILL ANIMAL CONTROL OFFICE   912-727-3884

MCINTOSH ANIMAL CONTROL    912-437-4242

CHATHAM COUNTY ANIMAL CONTROL   912-652-6575

 

 

****WILDLIFE REMOVAL COMPANIES

TRU TECH INC   1-80-842-7296

COASTAL WILDLIFE REMOVAL

WWW.COASTALWILDLIFEREMOVAL.COM

912-473-2930

912-266-3063

 

PET CREMATION

Pet Cremation Services 912-882-2900

 

Good Shepherd Cremation

866-332-3738

THESE ARE PAID SERVICES, SO IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN THE SERVICES PROVIDED YOU WILL NEED TO CONTACT THEM DIRECTLY TO FIND OUT PRICING AND PRODUCTS!

Protect Your Pets

http://www.georgiaencyclopedia.org/articles/geography-environment/reptiles-and-amphibians

 

http://srelherp.uga.edu/herps.htm

 

http://www.enature.com

 

http://www.municode.com

The above website is a comprehensive site with the laws, city, and county ordinances from all across the U.S. in an easy to maneuver web site.  ***For all animal owners please look at this no matter where in the U.S. you reside!!!!!!****

 

 

http://www.peteducation.com/

The above is a very, very important site for pet family members.  Please check it out!!!!! 

Job Postings

County Parks and Recreation Facilities

Disaster preparedness

Make a Plan for Your Pet

Leaving pets out of evacuation plans can put pets, pet owners, and first responders in danger. Even if you try to create a safe place for them, pets left behind during a disaster are likely to be injured, lost, or worse.  It is your responsibility as a pet owner to find out what type of shelters and assistance are available in your area to accommodate pets and to include pets in your disaster plan to keep them safe during an emergency.

Have you included pets in your disaster plan? Don’t wait until it’s too late. Start today by:

  • Making a plan and
  • Preparing a disaster kit

By doing so, you are protecting the health of not only your pet, but yourself, your family, and others in your community.

To get started, familiarize yourself with the types of disasters that could impact your area and consider your options for providing care for your pet(s).

Make a Plan

Photo: Dog on a float

Disasters can happen without warning, so be prepared for these events:

  • Make sure your pet(s) wear collars and tags with up-to-date contact information and other identification.
  • Microchip your pet(s) – this is one of the best ways to ensure that you and your pet are reunited if you are separated. Always be sure to register the microchip with the manufacturer and keep your contact information up to date with the microchip company.
  • Purchase a pet carrier for each of your pets (write your pet's name, your name and contact information on each carrier).
    • Familiarize your pet with its transport crate before a crisis.
    • Practice transporting your pet by taking them in for rides in a vehicle similar to one you would be evacuating in.
    • Practice catching your pet, if needed.
  • Keep a leash and/or carrier nearby the exit.
  • Ensure proper equipment for pets to ride in the car (carriers, harnesses, pet seatbelts).
  • If you do not have a car, make arrangements with neighbors, family and friends. You can also contact your local government to learn about transportation options during a disaster.
  • Decide where you and your pet are going to stay. Based on the severity of a disaster, you may have two options for your pets:
    • Sheltering in place
    • Sheltering in a facility away from home (during an evacuation)

Sheltering in Place
When sheltering at home with your pet, make sure the room chosen is pet-friendly in the following ways:

  • Select a safe room, preferably an interior room with no (or few) windows.
  • Remove any toxic chemicals or plants.
  • Close off small areas where frightened cats could get stuck in (such as vents or beneath heavy furniture).

Sheltering during an evacuation

  • Contact your local emergency management office and ask if they offer accommodations for owners and their pets.
  • If accommodations are needed for your pet(s):
    • Contact local veterinary clinics, boarding facilities, and local animal shelters. Visit the Humane Society website to find a shelter in your area. .
    • Contact family or friends outside the evacuation area.
    • Contact a pet-friendly hotel, particularly along evacuation routes.
  • Make plans before disaster strikes for where you and your pets will go. Be aware that pets may not be allowed in local human shelters, unless they are service animals.

Prepare a Pet Disaster Kit

Photo: Dog tag

Prepare a disaster kit for your pet(s), so evacuation will go smoothly for your entire family. Ask your veterinarian for help putting it together. Here is a checklist to get you started. Some examples of what to include are:

Disaster Supplies for Pets

  • Food (in airtight waterproof containers or cans) and water for at least 2 weeks for each pet
  • Food and water bowls and a manual can opener
  • For cats: litter box and litter
  • For dogs: plastic bags for poop
  • Clean-up items for bathroom accidents (paper towels, plastic trash bags, bleach-containing cleaning agent)
  • Medications for at least 2 weeks, along with any treats used to give the medications and pharmacy contact for refills
  • Medical records
    • Rabies vaccination certificate
    • Current vaccination record
    • If your pet has a microchip, a record of the microchip number
    • Prescription for medication(s)
    • For cats, most recent FeLV/FIV test result or vaccination date
    • Summary of pertinent medical history; ask your veterinarian for a copy
  • Sturdy leashes or harnesses
  • Carrier or cage that is large enough for your pet to stand comfortably and turn around; towels or blankets
  • Pet toys and bed (familiar items to help the pet[s] feel more comfortable).
  • A handout containing identification information (in the event you get separated from your pet)
    • Current photo of pet
    • Pet’s descriptive features (age, sex, neutered/non-neutered status, color(s), and approximate weight)
    • Microchip number
    • Owner contact information (cell phone, work phone, home phone)
    • Contact information of a close relative or friend,
  • A handout with boarding instructions, such as feeding schedule, medications, and any known allergies and behavior problems
  • Documents, medications, and food should be stored in waterproof containers

Protect Yourself from Injury and Illness

  • Disasters are stressful for humans and pets alike. Practice safe handling of your pet, because your pet may behave differently during a stressful situation.
  • To avoid common diseases that pets can transmit to people
    • Wash your hands before and after handling your pet and its waste
    • Wash your hands right after handling pet food or treats
    • Wash your hands after picking up your pet’s stool or cleaning a litter box
    • Avoid letting your pet lick your face or hands

Diseases Pets Can Transmit to People During a Natural Disaster

Photo: Dog with suitcase

Natural disasters can contribute to the transmission of some diseases. Exposure to inclement weather conditions, stagnant water, wildlife or unfamiliar animals, and overcrowding can put your pet at risk for getting sick. Some of these illnesses can be transmitted to people. Some common disaster-related diseases that pets can pass to people are listed below.

Rabies is a virus that affects the nervous system in both animals and people. Rabies is transmitted through bites from rabid animals or through contact with their saliva.To protect you and your pet:

  • Keep your pet up-to-date on rabies vaccine
  • Report any bite wounds to medical personnel immediately
  • Practice safe handling of pets in a stressful situation
  • Keep your pet in a carrier or on a leash
  • Do not allow your pet to interact with other animals

Ringworm is a condition caused by a fungus that can infect skin, hair, and nails of both people and animals. Ringworm is transmitted from animals to people through direct contact with an infected animal's skin or hair or through touching an object where an affected animal has been. To protect your family from ringworm:

  • Wash your hands after touching any animal
  • Do not let your pet interact with other animals
  • Use disinfectant to clean the cage and litter box

Leptospirosis is a bacterial disease found in the urine of infected animals that can cause kidney damage and affect other organs. It is transmitted through contact with infected urine or contaminated water, soil, and food.

  • Talk to your veterinarian about vaccinating your pet for leptospirosis
  • Wash your hands after coming in contact with urine
  • Avoid stagnant water, especially after flooding occurring after natural disasters
  • Don’t allow pets to play in or drink contaminated water

Diseases spread by mosquitoes, fleas, and ticks: Mosquitoes, fleas, and ticks are common pests of stray animals and can be a problem immediately following a disaster situation. Their bites irritate the skin and may also carry a variety of diseases (Lyme disease, West Nile virus) harmful to both humans and animals. To prevent illnesses associated with mosquitoes, fleas, and ticks:

  • Keep your pet up-to-date on heartworm and flea and tick preventive treatments
  • Keep your pet away from wildlife and stray animals
  • Wash your pet’s bedding regularly

Visit Healthy Pets Healthy People for more information on diseases animals can transmit to humans.

Photo: Lost pet flyer

What if I am separated from my pet?

Make sure that your family is in a safe location before you begin your search.

  • If you are in a shelter that houses pets, inform one of the pet caretakers. Give the pet caretaker your pre-made missing pet handout.
  • Once you have been cleared to leave the shelter and return home, contact animal control about your lost pet.
  • Last, call the microchip company to make sure all the information about you and your pet is updated and current.
 

More Information

 
 
 

Animal Health

Pets are susceptible to many diseases, no matter where you live. Many diseases and conditions are preventable. The keys to disease prevention are regular veterinarian visits and keeping your pets' vaccinations up-to-date. Many diseases that used to plague pets and their owners, such as distemper and rabies, are now largely controlled by vaccines. Vaccines work only if they are given when necessary and updated as required. Diseases and conditions that cannot be vaccinated against can often be controlled by maintaining a clean living space, minimizing your pet's exposure to disease-causing organisms and providing a healthy diet for your pet.

 

Welcome

Drug Court Overview

The Atlantic Judicial Circuit of Georgia's Drug Court was est. in 2009 under the leadership of Superior Court Judge D. Jay Stewart to reduce substance abuse, related criminal activity and recidivism by providing quality, holistic substance abuse treatment and thereby creating a safer community environment as an alternative form for offender rehabilitation. The 24-month program provides offenders intensive outpatient chemical dependency treatment that is supervised by judge.

 

Mission and Goals


The mission of the Atlantic Judicial Council Drug Court is to reduce substance abuse, related criminal activity and recidivism by providing quality, holistic substance abuse treatment and thereby creating a safer community environment.


Drug Court Goals:

  • To assist drug court participants in becoming abstinent and maintaining sobriety.
  • To minimize recidivism among drug court participants;
  • To improve the quality of life of drug court participants and their families through vocational training and drug education;
  • To improve public safety by reducing the crime rate in our community.
  • To pay restitution to victim and/or community, if any.

To Locate Ordinances Related to Animals

Re-homing Animals

We all realize that times are difficult, however, that animal that you brought into your family didn't ask that you do so, nor did they ask to be born.  So when thinking about getting rid of your pet be thoughtful.  DO NOT demand that a rescue group or shelter take your animal on the spot!  Both shelters and rescue groups are full or nearly full all year round, due to the unwanted pet population all across this nation.  One of the  many reasons for my job security. 

 

Most people KNOW when they are moving enough in advance to plan to rent a place that accepts animals (to include specific breeds that are allowed)!

 

When thinking about re-homing your pet there are certain things you should do:

1.  Make sure your pet is up to date on vaccines (dogs on heartworm prevention) or you have a negative heartworm test or negative Felv and Aids test.  Do NOT try to rid yourself of animal because of these positive tests most rescue groups will not accept animals with these illnesses due to the cost to treat them.

2. Make sure you have a complete medical record for your pets to present to the adopter or rescue group, makes life a little easier for them to accept an animal.

3. DO NOT expect them to be able to take your animal in on your final day in the area, it's NOT going to happen.

4. Begin well in advance, of a move, to locate either a new family, shelter, or rescue group to take your pet.  If you can't or are unwilling to do this, be responsible and do the right thing by taking your pet to a veterinarian and have it euthanized.  DO NOT abandon your animal out in the country or down a dirt road, it's not fair to that animal who has been solely dependent upon you for their care. 

5. Never offer the animal free to a good home, always charge a small re-homing fee for them.  If you do this you will more than likely have someone take your pet that will actually care for it rather than use as a bait animal.  (yes there are dog fighting rings in our area and they use animals to bait and train these dogs)

6.  Remember that dumping an animal is illegal and if you are caught you can be prosecuted and sent to jail, so please do the right thing. 

7.  Be responsible and spay/neuter your pets, it will help curb the homeless population.  We see too many pure bred animals come into animal control facilities that it's scary to know that someone paid and didn't come find their family member.

8.  Be prepared to answer questions and subject your animal to temperament testing if you're trying to surrender your animal to an animal shelter or rescue group.  Animals are not disposable property and should not be treated as such.

When looking to adopt an animal

Adopting the perfect pet is not always an easy decision.  Many people decide that they want a small dog, however, that is not always a good fit, especially with small children in the home.  Why you ask?  Because small dogs are more tender and easily hurt.  Children don't often know that they have to be easy or exactly what easy petting is to an animal.  Small dogs do not generally just bite and run.  They often bite, bite, bite in order to get their point across.  Many medium to large breed dogs are better family pets and can be inside dogs as easily as a small one, you just have to be willing to teach them what the appropriate behavior needs to be. Be consistent in their learning process and always, always praise their successes.

You should do breed research on any dog you think you might like to bring into your home.  You can do this by going to the AKC, CKC, and other related websites.  You will gain valuable information on the breed, their genetics (possible disorders like hip dysplasia), general temperaments, etc. 

If you find that you must have a pure bred dog there are many rescues out there that only accept pure breeds.  Take a look at www.petfinder.com 

This website can put you in contact with many of the pure breed rescues all you have to do is input your search material and it's a very simple and easily understood format.

 

Rabies Vectors

Carriers of Rabies

Foxes, skunks, raccoons, groundhogs, and bats are rabies vector species and can carry the rabies virus without showing any of the typical symptoms.  It is important to handle these animals with caution if you need to rescue one.  Use gloves, towels or other thick materials. Some symptoms the animal might display are signs of neurological disorder, dragging rear legs, excessive drooling, scruffy fur and/or any discharge from the eyes and nose.  Prevent any type of exposure to the animal.  Exposure would be you coming into contact with the animal's saliva from a bite or on any open wounds and mucus areas like the eyes, nose and mouth. These symptoms could also be signs of parvo virus or distemper in raccoons and foxes, keep away from your pets.

Civil Claims

Filing a suit in the Magistrate Court is simple.  The format and form prescribed by the law are uncomplicated and easy to follow.

                There are several practical preliminary considerations, which each Plaintiff should review prior to filing the claim. He/She must remember that the collectibility of his / her claim or debt will depend on more than merely obtaining a judgment or a Fi Fa against the Defendant. Collecting the judgment can be difficult work when the Defendant has no job or owns no property. Before filing a suit and investing further money in the case a Plaintiff should evaluate his / her case and the collectibility of a judgment against the Defendant.  A Plaintiff should determine the correct home address of a Defendant because the Plaintiff accomplishes nothing if he files a suit and service cannot be perfected on the Defendant. 

                If the claim is based on a writing, whether it is a promissory note, an Industrial Loan Contract or other type of document, the Plaintiff should furnish the court with a copy of the instrument to attach to the claim.  It is also helpful to include a copy of a ledger card or written record showing a history or payment record with the claim.  Whether it is an action on an open account or on a note, have these items ready when the claim is filed.  If the claim is based on a Tort (damages to person or property of Plaintiff) or a Trover action (Defendant holding property of Plaintiff) all evidence and witnesses necessary to prove your case or defend yourself must be brought to court at the time of the hearing.   

                The jurisdictional limit in Magistrate Court is $15,000.00. If the claim exceeds the jurisdictional limit the court does not have jurisdiction to hear the case. 

                Remember that the Plaintiff must prove his / her case.  He / she should evaluate all of the proof prior to filing the claim.  The Plaintiff can present documents and valid testimony to support his / her case. He / she should have available all of the documents evidencing the transaction, or incident.  Consumers should retain copies of their written warranties, sales tickets, and canceled checks, as well as any other documents, which concern the transactions on which a claim is based. 

  1. Your claim must be in the amount of $1.00 to $15,000.00. The Defendant must reside in Liberty County, in order for this court to have jurisdiction.  The Defendant’s complete name and address must be provided at the time of filing your claim.  A route number and box number are sufficient.  A Post Office Box will not be sufficient, but if you have very good directions to the actual residence it may be used. If your claim is against a Corporation, you must have the name of the owner or registered agent.  Action is commenced by signing an affidavit under oath by the Plaintiff or agent.  We will serve at place of employment but the Defendant must be served in person for the service to be valid. 
  1. All costs paid by Plaintiff are added to the sum owed by the Defendant if the Plaintiff is awarded judgment at the time of the hearing. The Defendant has 30 days from the date of service in which to answer the claim.  If an answer contesting the claim is received, the case file along with the Defendants answer will be forwarded to the Chief Magistrate’s office for review.  After the file is reviewed the Judge will determine whether the case needs to be scheduled for a court hearing or scheduled for a mediation hearing. The time and place of the hearing will be mailed to the Plaintiff and the Defendant.  If no answer is received, a judgment by default will be entered upon the written request of the Plaintiff.  The default judgment is not entered unless requested by the Plaintiff.  The Defendant, by law, has 15 days to reopen a default judgment upon payment of costs.  If no request to reopen is received the court may issue a Fi Fa at the request of the Plaintiff, and have it recorded on the General Execution Docket.
  1. In the event judgment is rendered in your favor, either by trial or default, you may: 
  • Levy on personal or real property (land) and sell through court.
  • Garnish wages on his/her job (cannot be self-employed).
  • Garnish a bank account, or anyone who owes money to the judgment debtor, or is holding money belonging to the judgment debtor. 

Your judgment is good for seven years and if it is still not satisfied in the seven years, you may have it renewed. You may file post judgment interrogatories to get information on the judgment debtor.  Otherwise, this office has no facilities to assist you in locating property of the Defendant or locating a job or bank account of the Defendant and cannot by its’ judgment guarantee collection of the money which may be found owing to you.  This information is furnished to you through the courtesy of this office in an effort to help you better understand your position and what to expect from your court action. 

COURT COSTS

  •  Civil Claims. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$99.00
    • For 2 Defendants at different addresses add $50.00 for each additional Defendant
  • Dispossessory warrants. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$74.00
    • For 2 Defendants at different addresses add $25.00 for each additional Defendant
  • Garnishments. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$105.00
  • Writs of Possession. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $99.00

*Optional:  Civil Claims and Dispossessories may be electronically filed on www.libertyco.com for an additional $15.00 convenience fee.* 

The following information is provided to help you better understand the law governing the operation of the Magistrate Court.

 The major differences between The Magistrate Court and other courts are:

  • Neither the Plaintiff nor the Defendant are required to be represented by an attorney.
  • The Magistrate Court is the only court that has discretionary power to stay execution of a judgment to order partial payments based on a reasonable conclusion for a steady reduction and final satisfaction of a judgment.

It is the duty of the court system in Georgia in civil cases to render judgments.  It is not the duty or purpose of any court to function as a collection agency on behalf of the judgment holder.  Once a judgment has been rendered the court has completed its responsibility in that action.  It is the responsibility of the judgment holder to collect the judgment by using the methods described in # 3 above.

Magistrate Court Civil Claims can be filed in the Liberty County Clerk of Courts Office located at 201 South Main Street, Suite 1200, Hinesville, Georgia  31313, or mailed to the Clerk of Courts Office at the above address.  

For more information about Civil Claims please select from the options below:

Please refer to the Guidelines for Clerks for understanding of what a clerk may or may not do to assist a party.

 

Disclaimer:  The information and forms available on this website are not intended as legal advice and should not be considered as such; they are provided for reference ONLY.  Consult an attorney for legal advice.

Dispossessory

A dispossessory is an action to evict a person from the apartment, house, condominium, or room he or she rents. 

Dispossessory Procedures:

There are three grounds upon which a dispossessory proceeding may be filed:

  • The tenant fails to pay rent that is due.
  • The tenant is holding over beyond the term of the lease.
  • The tenant is at sufferance following a foreclosure sale.

If any of these grounds exist, the Landlord must make a demand for possession of premises before filing a dispossessory affidavit.  It is recommended that the demand be made in writing to eliminate any questions about the timing or wording of the demand.

Filing a Dispossessory Affidavit:

To file a dispossessory affidavit the Plaintiff/Landlord must go to the Liberty County Clerk of Courts Office located at 201 South Main Street, Suite 1200, Hinesville, Georgia  31313, or mail the paperwork to the Clerk of Courts Office at the above address.  There is a filing fee involved and the amount depends on the number of tenants to be served.  Once the dispossessory affidavit has been filed and paid for, the Liberty County Sheriff’s Department will perform service of the dispossessory affidavit on the property.  There are three types of service:

1)  Tack and mail:  The deputy will simply tack one copy to the door and send the other through the mail.

2)   Personal:  The named Defendant is served in person by the Deputy.

3)   Notorious:  If the Deputy is attempting personal service and someone of suitable age (this does not have to be someone 21 years of age or older) other than the named Defendant accepts service of affidavit, notorious service has been achieved. 

Once service has been perfected, the dispossessory affidavit is returned to the Clerk’s Office where it is entered in the computer system.  A copy with the case number and service information is returned to the Plaintiff/Landlord.

The Answer:

Once the dispossessory affidavit has been served, the defendant has seven (7) days to file an answer.  An answer is the Defendant’s opportunity to challenge the claims made by the Plaintiff/Landlord, offer reasons for late or non-payment of rent, or any other legal defense.  The answer can be filed at the Clerk’s Office, in the Liberty County Justice Center, Suite 1200.  If the answer is mailed, please understand that it must be received in the Clerk’s office by the last day to answer or it will be considered late.  Under no circumstances can a clerk accept an answer by telephone.  If the Defendant is unable to file an answer in person it is possible to send someone to answer known as the respondent.  The respondent will be permitted to answer the dispossessory affidavit, but the respondent will not be allowed to appear in court for the Defendant.  When the answer is filed, a court date is assigned.  The court date will always be at least one (1) week from the date of answer.  The day after the answer is filed a clerk will enter the answer and court date and send a copy of the answer with the notice of trial to the Plaintiff/Landlord.  If you wish to call to check if an answer has been filed, please wait until after 2:00 p.m. the day after the last day to answer.

Appearing in Court:

Trials of contested cases in the Magistrate Court are held in the Magistrate Courtroom in the Justice Center, located on the Second (2nd) floor.  If you are scheduled to appear in court for a contested case, you must be in the courtroom at the time set by the clerk.

Any Defendant who does not appear in court will be found in default and an immediate Writ of Possession as well as full money judgement can be awarded to the Plaintiff/Landlord.  Any Plaintiff/Landlord who does not appear will have their case Dismissed for Want of Prosecution (DWOP).

Please be advised that the Landlord and Tenant must bring all evidence (receipts, records, pictures, and witnesses, etc.) to court at the time of the hearing.  Cases will not be continued to allow the parties to collect their evidence.   

All evidence must be available for the court at the time of the hearing.

Cases that are not contested will be subject to a judgement on the pleadings.

A party has the right to appeal any adverse decision made in court.  The appeal must be filed within seven (7) days of the order and strictly follow procedures set out by statue; this includes the amount of the judgment as well as court costs to the higher court.  In the event of an appeal, pursuant to O.C.G.A. § 44-7-56, in order for the defendant(s) to remain in possession of the premises, the defendant(s) shall pay into the registry of the court the sum found as past due rent.  Furthermore, the tenant shall pay future rent, in the amount of monthly rate per month beginning on the next due date and continuing on the same day of each month thereafter until the issue has been finally determined upon appeal.  The failure to comply with this provision may cause an immediate writ of possession for the possession of the premises to be issued instanter by a court of competent jurisdiction. 

Writ of Possession:

If the Defendant failed to answer, a writ may be issued.  The application/request for a Writ of Possession must be filed by the Plaintiff/Landlord; it is not automatically issued.  There is not fee for a Writ of Possession to be issued.  Once the application/request in filed, it will be processed by a clerk and sent to the Judge’s office for review and issuance.  Once the Writ of Possession is signed a copy will be mailed to the Plaintiff/Landlord and the Defendant. 

Writ of Possession Execution:

The Writ of Possession is not automatically executed by the Sheriff’s department.  A written application/request and a $25.00 fee are required from the Plaintiff/Landlord.  It is the Plaintiff/Landlord’s responsibility to provide the labor for the eviction; the Deputy is there only to oversee and keep the Peace.

COURT COSTS

Dispossessory. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $74.00

  • Additional Service. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .add $25.00 for each additional defendant

Writ of Possession. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $0.00

Writ of Possession (To be Executed). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$25.00

Garnishments. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$105.00

Fi Fa. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$9.00

*Optional:  Dispossessory may be electronically filed on www.libertyco.com for an additional $15.00                           convenience fee.*

 

Please refer to the Guidelines for Clerks for understanding of what a clerk may or may not do to assist a party. 

  

Disclaimer:  The information and forms available on this website are not intended as legal advice and should not be considered as such; they are provided for reference ONLY.  Consult an attorney for legal advice.

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Joseph Brown
Joseph Brown,
County Administrator

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112 N Main St
Room 2200
Hinesville, GA 31313
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Jerry Johnson
Jerry Johnson,
Building Maintenance Superintendent

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112 N Main St
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Hinesville, GA 31313
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100 Main St
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Hinesville, GA 31313
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Mike Hodges
Mike Hodges,
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100 Liberty St
Hinesville, GA 31313
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Clint Stanley
Clint Stanley,
Director of IT

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100- A Liberty St
Hinesville, GA 31313
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Hinesville, GA 31313
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Virgil M. Jones,
Tax Commissioner

100 Main St
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Hinesville, GA 31313
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Clenton Wells
Clenton Wells,
Public Works Director

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Hinesville, GA 31313
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Hinesville, GA 31313
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Sara Swida
Sara Swida,
Director

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Midway, GA 31320
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Randy Durrence
Randy Durrence,
Animal Control Director

1731 Lee Place Road N E
Hinesville, GA 31313
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Frazier Sylvers
Frazier Sylvers,
Mosquito Control Director

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Bob Sprinkel
Bob Sprinkel,
Asst. County Administrator

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112 N Main St
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Hinesville, GA 31313
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Hinesville, GA 31313
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Erica Smith,
Deputy Director

  • Phone: (912) 368-3911
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Midway, GA 31320
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Clenton Wells
Clenton Wells,
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Paul Zechman,
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Melinda Anderson
Melinda Anderson,
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201 S Main St
Suite 2100
Hinesville, GA 31313
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Ella Golden,
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Reginald L. Pierce, Sr.,
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